Hear the sound of Whooping Cough



Are there places I can get more information about H1N1?

Yes, you can find more information on the following websites:

  • www.flu.gov (Great resource from CDC specifically about flu) 
  • www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu (Great resource; guidelines for different populations) 
  • www.cdph.ca.gov (California Department of Public Health; great site with links to flu information in multiple languages) 
  • www.solanocounty.com/H1N1 (for local Solano County statistics and information including community vaccination clinic schedules and safety net flu clinic locations for uninsured patients) 
  • www.who.int (International status of H1N1)

You can also call the following telephone numbers for more information:

  • 2-1-1 or 1 (800) 273-6222 (Up to date local information) 
  • California Department of Public Health Hotline 1 (888) 865-0564 
  • CDC Hotline 1 (800) 232-4636

Are there places I can get more information about Pertussis?

 You can also call the following telephone numbers for more information on where to receive pertussis vaccination:

  • 2-1-1 or (800)273-6222
  • California Department of Public Health Hotline (888) 865-0564
  • CDC Hotline (800) 232-4636

How common is Pertussis (Whooping Cough)?

As of 11/30/2010, there have been 7,297 confirmed, probable, and suspect cases of pertussis, with onset from January 1 though November 30, 2010, reported to the California Department of Public Health resulting in an average of 18.7 cases per 100,000.

How is Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Spread?

People with pertussis usually spread the disease by coughing or sneezing while in close contact with others, who then breathe in the pertussis bacteria. Many infants who get pertussis are infected by parents, older siblings, or other caregivers who might not know they have the disease.

What are the symptoms of Pertussis?

Early symptoms are like the common cold: 

  • Runny nose 
  • Low or no fever 
  • Sneezing 
  • Mild cough

Symptoms in infants are different 
Infants younger than 6 months old often do not have a typical cough. In early stages infants may: 

  • Gasp or gag 
  • Get very tired 
  • Stop breathing 
  • Seizures

What is Give Kids a Smile Day?

Click here for more information.

What is Pertussis?

Pertussis (Whooping Cough) is a highly contagious bacterial infection that causes coughing and gagging with little or no fever.  An infected person has coughing episodes that may end in vomiting or cause a "whoop" sound when the person tries to breath.

What should I do to protect myself and my family from Pertussis

CDPH recommends that the best way to prevent pertussis is to get vaccinated. There are vaccines for children, pre-teens, teens and adults. The childhood vaccine is called DTaP, and the pertussis booster vaccine for adolescents and adults is called Tdap. Talk to your healthcare provider about getting vaccinated against pertussis (whooping cough).